Tagged: corrective and preventive actions RSS

  • support 3:16 am on September 17, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: corrective action plan ISO 9001, corrective and preventive actions, , , , , root cause analysis,   

    Effective Use of Your Corrective Action Plan In Quality Management (QMS) 

    A corrective action plan is far more than picking up the phone to call another department to report a defect.  In this video training clip, we feature BIZPHYX SVP, Bob Clancy providing tips on how to strengthen your organization’s corrective action plan.

    He discusses data collection and analysis to support “lessons learned” and as a way to prevent problems in the future. Bob details how to verify if you have a formal corrective action plan that includes true root cause analysis and how to maximize that process.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dMwiQAhiV9c

    For further assistance please contact bclancy@bizphyx.com.

     
  • support 12:48 am on September 27, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: best practices, CAPA system, corrective and preventive actions, , , ,   

    Using The CAPA System To Address Audit Findings 

    An important aspect of any quality management system involves communicating the results of quality audits and inspections to employees so that the same mistakes are not repeated.  It is important to do this systematically, so that the communication of lessons learned can be done more than once and that lessons learned aren’t lost over time.   As a best practice, many companies use their corrective and preventive action (CAPA) system to address audit findings and handle this communication methodically.

    Here is how it works:

    Once the audit is complete, an audit finding is entered on a corrective action.  The action is assigned for root cause analysis and once the analysis is done, the appropriate correction is selected to address the audit finding.  Then, an action plan is developed to prevent the root cause of the finding.  This discipline forces more effective analysis and problem solving.

    The important last step is to circulate the results of the analysis and the actions taken to other employees. This allows each employee to benefit from all of the analysis and problem solving effort.  Consider having frequent job huddles with affected employees where corrective actions are shared.  Other methods to consider include using a web portal for employees to view them or conducting “lunch and learn sessions.” Many different communication methods will work, but it is important to make sure that employees are made aware of the results of audits, inspections and other corrective/preventive actions.  You may want to combine several of these methods.  Studies have shown that in order to get a message across you need to put the information in front of individuals seven times!  Over-communication is the key!  For help with quality management best practices and questions, contact bclancy@bizphyx.com.

     
  • support 4:29 am on September 14, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , corrective and preventive actions, , , ,   

    Can You Save Personnel With Your QMS? 

    While working with a client recently, we covered how their QMS could improve corporate profitability and a discussion of employee retention developed.  Can you actually save and retain quality personnel with your QMS?  Quality management systems such as TL 9000 and ISO 9001 are known to be effective in many ways, but have you considered that they may actually help you keep from losing valuable people? While there is no real data to support this contention, companies will provide numerous anecdotal accounts suggesting that this is true.  The difference is how management identifies and handles quality problems.

    There are basically two completely opposite methods used by management to deal with quality problems.  One method is to use the “ready, fire, aim” approach.  Management jumps to a quick solution after weak analysis and blames an employee or group of employees.  This is acceptable to employees at large, until they themselves become the targets of the blame game.  Once this culture takes hold it doesn’t take long for employees to duck problem solving to avoid being “called out.”  In the end, many employees will leave a company that has a corporate culture of blame.

    The second method is to use quality management techniques to solve quality issues.  For this to work, top management must insist on a culture of no blame, in which process change is the result of deep and effective problem analysis. In this culture, problems are viewed as opportunities to make the overall business better. The focus is on “process failure” rather than “personal” failure and problem analysis and corrective action are conducted in a formal way.  Because we rely on formal problem solving techniques, we seek data and facts to determine the root cause of a problem.  Does this mean that people never cause problems?  No.  However, when it turns out that a problem is the result of direct human failure, it is dealt with as the “exception” versus the rule, with the employee being dealt with in private.  For more information on deploying these and other techniques in your QMS, please contact us at info@bizphyx.com.

     
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