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  • support 3:37 pm on June 2, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ,   

    The ISO 9001:2015 Revision: How Proposed Changes Will Impact TL 9000, ISO 14001 and Other Related Standards 

    As many of our clients are aware, ISO 9001: 2008 is under revision.  ISO 9001 is one of the most widely used ISO quality standards.  The proposed revisions have worked their way through the Working Draft (WD) and Committee Draft (CD) stages and are now available as a Draft International Standard (DIS), a key milestone in the revision process.

    Since changes to ISO 9001: 2008 will impact other quality standards like TL 9000 and ISO 14001 (as examples), we like to keep to readers aware of the potential changes and impacts to their existing quality systems.  As active members in QuEST Forum the governing body over TL 9000, we can report that organizationally we’re waiting to see what changes occur with ISO 9001 before significant revisions are made to the current TL 9000 quality standard.  Since TL 9000 is the ISO based quality standard of the ICT and telecommunications industry, changes to ISO 9001 may have an impact on the standard as well.

    We felt the timing was right to provide our readers with relevant information, as well as source material on the revision process and the proposed changes, especially coming off of the recent ASQ Conference on World Quality.  Everyone is waiting to see how much of the DIS will be upheld and what we’ll have to work with in 2015.

     

    Timeline For Change:

    Like all ISO standards, ISO 9001 is reviewed every five years and is now being revised to ensure it is relevant and up-to-date.  At the DIS stage all interested parties can submit feedback that will be considered before the final draft is published by the end of 2015.  After public comments are collected, the revised standard will work its way to FDIS status (Final Draft International Standard), which is expected to take place by July 2015, with the published standard targeted for September 2015.  Once the new standard is published in September (or by the end of December 2015), there begins a 3-year transition period for implementation to the revised standard.

    Since the publication of the Draft International Standard (DIS), which is available at many sites including ISO (click here), many certifying bodies (CBs), Registrars, consultants, auditors and quality organizations have offered their opinions on the proposed changes.  Below the video, you will find links to these source materials.  While everyone has their own take on the DIS, generally here’s what we know will change and why:

     

    Why The Standard Will Change:

    It’s important that the standard remain relevant with regard to changing times, products and services and evolving economies of scale.  As a result, ISO wants to develop a more consistent foundation for the long-term (25 years) and one that will facilitate better integration among all the various quality standards.  Certainly it is ISO’s goal to increase adoption of the standard and to do so, it is necessary to address the rise of service organizations (vs. manufacturing) and the technological changes that impact the way we work in terms of telecommuting and the “virtual office”.

     

    Quick Overview Of What Will Change:

    ISO 9001 (along with ISO 14001 and ISO 27001) is under revision to the common framework.  Annex SL is the generally used shorthand for this and there is a larger push to align all future ISO management system standards under the new Annex SL model.  Revision to the common framework is intended to enhance the alignment and compatibility of standards.  Some of the proposed changes include:

     

    –An emphasis on risk based management. Risk management is in, preventive action out

    Organizational Context.  A new clause that will require the organization to define itself, determine internal and external issues relevant to its purpose and that affect its ability to achieve the outcomes in their quality management system.   It’s a new way of viewing the QMS.

    Process Approach is now embedded in requirements

    –No Management Representative or Quality Manual is required

    –Numerous terminology changes (for example “product” is now “goods and services”)

    New clause numbers in the High Level Structure

    –More leadership requirements for management as well as an emphasis on achieving “value” for the organization and its customers

    A change in structure.  There are now 10 main clauses proposed which speak to the alignment with other standards (see below):

     

    (from DNV-GL)

     

    Here’s a brief video clip from ASQ TV (the full video link is provided below with a list of source materials)

     

    Source Materials For Your Consideration:

    We’ve provided links to some of the better summaries, videos and source materials that we’ve reviewed:

     

    An intense 1-hour overview webinar (with PDF) of the process from CD to DIS from DNV-GL

    (DNV-GL Business Assurance is a global certification body headquartered in Milan, Italy.  Our CEO participated in this live webinar overview in 2013).

    A follow-up PDF on the DIS for ISO 9001:2015 from DNV-GL.  It outlines the main changes

    (Burt Holm, Northern District Sales Manager for the USA facilitated this.  We think it’s excellent and have posted it on our Knowledge Base).

    Full video link from Mark Ames on ASQ TV

    (From the ASQ TV channel as featured during their recent Conference On World Quality).

    An overview from the NQA blog

    (NQA is a highly respected global Registrar known as National Quality Assurance)

    An overview PDF presentation from ASQ

    (ASQ is the American Society for Quality.  BIZPHYX is a member of ASQ)

    An overview from SGS on the Committee Draft (CD) stage

    (SGS is a multinational company headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland which provides inspection, verification, testing and certification services)

    We will keep our readers aware of any updates to the process as they occur here on our blog and on the BIZPHYX Knowledgebase.

     

    The most important thing you must consider is that change is coming and some believe for the better.

     

    Learn about theses changes as you see fit.  Evaluate whether or not these changes will impact your organization. Open a discussion with your quality consultant or Registrar.  There will be time once the final standard is published to revise your quality system before the transition period (3-years) is complete.  For more information on the ISO 9001: 2015 revision, contact info@bizphyx.com.

     
  • support 2:55 am on April 28, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Data Privacy, data security, , Heartbleed, , , , R2/RIOS,   

    Data Privacy, Heartbleed and A Growing Energy Footprint: 2014 May Be A Bit Challenging For ICT Quality 

    As our readers know, we certify clients in the telecommunications and ICT industry to quality standards such as TL 9000, ISO 90001, ISO 14001 and ISO 27001.  We also help many of these clients solve their recycling and e-waste objectives by helping them obtain R2/RIOS certifications.

    Much has happened in first quarter of 2014 that impacts the ICT industry in the areas of network quality, data security, environmental sustainability and recycling.  Each of these business practices are subject to constant transformation and in some instances, are under assault.  The reality is the environment is at stake, electronics waste is piling up, spying is the “new norm” and foreign hackers are chipping away at our US data fortresses.  What is an ICT supplier to do in 2014?  Implement quality standards to mitigate these risks.

    What makes our work in ICT so interesting is that these areas often intersect, requiring more complex and thoughtful quality frameworks to be implemented within organizations.  For example, as everything moves to the cloud, not only is data security an issue (ISO 27001), there have been serious discussions about the increasing energy footprint of the digital economy and ICT in general.  This presents a bit of a quandary for suppliers who are also committed to energy reduction and sustainability practices through their EMS (ISO 14001) while shifting more of their services to the cloud.  Can you effectively balance the goals and objectives of an ISMS and an EMS simultaneously?  We believe that you can.

    If you’re sitting on the fence with regard to implementing any of these standards or if you’re considering whether it’s time to add an additional quality framework in your organization, here are some factors to consider and a Q1 update on what’s in play for these quality standards.

     

    ISO 27001:  Could the Hearbleed bug be good for Internet security?

    Q1 2014 has been plagued with numerous data hacks involving retailers like Target, Michael’s and a host of other vendors whose POS systems were compromised with very sophisticated malware.  Verizon just published a study regarding the increase in espionage hacking from Eastern Europe.  The continued revelations of Edward Snowden are the gift that keeps on giving and have forced many in ICT to examine the true value of privacy as practice of “data security”.

    These headaches have been compounded by the recent Heartbleed Bug (a flaw in OpenSSL).  It’s a bit unnerving to learn that the trusted “padlock of https” was been left essentially unlocked for quite some time.   Many articles in the past few weeks illustrate how the NSA likely knew for at least two years about this massive flaw.  The agency’s reported decision to keep the bug secret may have renewed the heated debate over the security of the Internet in general, which certainly impacts the entire ICT industry.  This recent article by re/code demonstrates how Heartbleed’s worst-case scenario has already been proven possible.  And what about the cloud?  As providers utilize or shift to IaaS, PaaS, SasS and SECasS, what are the known and unknown risks?  Is any data communication or transaction really secure?

    Some IT experts have illustrated how the Heartbleed bug may have been a real wake-up call for information and Internet security.  The breach could be viewed as a great test of vulnerability management and incident response.  What have you done in your organization to protect your company and your customers against this type of threat?  At a bare minimum, establish rules for what is allowed and not allowed on your network.  Here is a great link to an ISO 27001 Google Group thread discussing responses to Heartbleed utilizing this ISMS.

    If you don’t think ISO 27001 matters, here’s one company’s attempt at going on the offensive with positive public relations regarding their ISMS.  Snap Survey explains how client data has been unaffected by the Heartbleed bug, due to their ISO 27001 certification.  Consider implementing ISO 27001 today.

     

    ISO 14001:  Preventing pollution, eco-efficiency and life cycle thinking in the next revision?

    We can attest to the value of ISO 14001 from the clients we’ve led to certification.  Sustainability and environmental stewardship are no longer buzzwords.  All reputable brands and corporations (not just ICT organizations) are implementing environmental benchmarks and reporting processes.

    ISO recently conducted a survey of the environmental management system standard ISO 14001.  The survey was designed in part to get a better idea of what organizations see as the main benefits of ISO 14001 and what could be improved, as the standard is currently being revised.  According to the survey results, the most important issues that required more attention were:

    • reducing and controlling pollution

    • strategies for efficient use of resources and reducing waste and pollution

    • evaluating the environmental aspects related to the life cycle of products and services

    You can obtain a copy of all survey data and reports at ISO.  The standard revision is currently at draft phase and the goal is to “future proof” ISO 14001 to address all elements of environmental management, including energy efficiency and energy reduction.  Energy reduction has been the subject many technical articles with regard to the ICT industry, with some pointing out the Internet is far from green.

    The energy requirement of a growing “digital” economy (telecom, data centers) appears to be placing an increased demand on the power grid at a time where energy reduction is the preferred trend.  Potential conflict?  Perhaps.  That’s why it is very important for ICT companies to examine energy reduction and implement an EMS like ISO 14001 to set goals and objectives for environmental management.  Want some ICT best practices guidance?  AT&T and the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) are releasing their best practices and a toolkit that other companies can use to assess performance at their own facilities.

     

    R2/RIOS:  How are you dealing with e-waste?

    This leads to the subject of e-waste and recycling. Environmental management has many tentacles.  Specific to the ICT supply chain, many of our clients who are certified to the TL 9000 (the telecommunications quality standard) are now required to address electronic waste and recycling, either in their own organizations or as a requirement of doing business as a Tier 1 supplier.  There are multiple ways to meet this objective and we’ve been writing about this on our blog since 2011.

    The two prevailing approaches are R2/RIOS and e-Stewards.  In our industry, we are assisting more clients with R2/RIOS certifications and you will soon see this as a new practice area on our website.

    In fact, a recent article from GreenBiz addresses how e-waste is now a serious problem in the developing world and another provides a quick breakdown on the current rules of recycling electronic waste.  We see this trend continuing and we know that most of our ICT clients will be forced to address this issue internally and with corporate customers in 2014 and beyond.  Consider obtaining a R2/RIOS certification as a potential solution.

    As you can see, ICT quality has many layers outside of general quality and network quality (which is well managed through TL 9000 and ISO 9001 certification).  TL 9000 is expanding to deal with network security and next generation technologies.  However, ICT quality intersects with other important business quality challenges.

    How will you deal with data security, energy management and e-waste?  Consider the additional standards we’ve outlined!

    For more information on ISO 14001, ISO 27001 and R2/RIOS ertification please contact us at info@bizphyx.com.

     
  • support 12:36 pm on November 7, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , DVBE, HBE, , , quality certifications, supplier diversity, , WBCSouthwest, , ,   

    A Business Case For Quality Certifications And Their Impact On Top Line Revenue 

    Today, nearly all Fortune 500 companies are faced with the challenge of sourcing and developing diverse suppliers.  It is now a basic practice in strategic sourcing and supply management.  Corporate customers are looking for new suppliers who can address demand, innovation, collaboration, problem solving and niche solutions.  Their suppliers must be able to provide metrics and performance data regarding speed to market, time to delivery, reliability (risk mitigation) and common measures of performance.

    If any supplier (diverse in status or not) can meet these customer needs, they can effectively compete in large supply chains.  As a result, quality management certifications like TL 9000 have (and ISO 9001) either become a requirement or a recognized competitive advantage that customers look for.

    This year, BIZPHYX published a case study that revealed what impact TL 9000 (and ISO 9001) certifications have on companies that choose to certify to the standard.  The study focused on a population of diverse supplier companies.

    Certified companies make a commitment when they become a “quality” organization.  With that decision comes the investment of both financial and human capital.  While we know that ISO 9001 and TL 9000 certifications will over time help a company to reduce costs, improve efficiency and provide a process for scalability and growth, diverse suppliers are primarily interested in certification if they can grow top line revenue.

     

    -TL-9000-Case-Study Figure 1

    The companies who participated in this study have revenues that range from less than $1M to $1B, providing a wide range of business perspectives

     

    Some key findings and metrics from the study:

    • 86% of the participants stated that certification to a quality management system (ISO 9001 and TL 9000) had a significant impact on their operations.

    • When asked if TL 9000 has helped them scale their businesses to handle growth, 85% stated that it had, while 15% stated it had not.

    • When asked if certifying to TL 9000 has helped their business grow in terms of market share or revenue, a surprising 75% reported business revenue growth.  25% stated their improvements were more operational, including cost reductions.

    Of the 75% who reported revenue growth, the range was from 20%-220% with an average of 108% growth and 71% reported an average of 3.4 years to realize revenue increases.

     

    BP-TL-9000-Case-Study Image-Figure 3

    In terms of dollars, one diverse supplier stated that prior to certification they were less than a $5M company and they now report revenues in excess of $10M (less than 2 years).  Another company reported going from $5M in revenue to $7.5M in revenue (less than 3 years).

     

    • The suppliers were asked if they had tried to leverage their certification to obtain new business.  71% reported trying to leverage their quality certification in this way.

    • 78% stated that certification to TL 9000 and ISO 9001 was worth the investment.

    •Risk in the supply chain is sharply reduced when quality certified suppliers are used.

     

    The study revealed some very powerful numbers in support of quality certifications for diverse suppliers both operationally and financially, in terms of opportunity for substantial revenue growth.

    To read the full case study (PDF), access the BIZPHYX Knowledge Base or e-mail info@bizphyx.com to receive a complimentary copy.

     

     
  • support 11:26 pm on March 8, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , ISM, , supplier diversity trends, , ,   

    Supplier Diversity Trends In 2012: Globalization and Sustainability 

    As members of both ISM (The Institute For Supply Management) and WBENC (The Women’s Business Enterprise Council), we have the unique privilege of experiencing supplier diversity from both sides.  We are a diverse supplier; yet in one segment of our business we help lead other diverse suppliers to ISO 9001, TL 9000 and ISO 14001 certifications, as part of our work with the supplier diversity departments of several Fortune 50 companies.

    We navigate many trends pertaining to supplier diversity. Certainly the two that are worth noting are the globalization of supply chains and corporate sustainability (which include environmental standards).

    When diverse suppliers enter corporate supply chains, they need to consider that they are in fact entering a global supply chain.  Minority and woman-owned businesses can provide competitive advantages and innovation in global supply chains–and supply management professionals have been working in global value chains for many years.  However, did you know the same is true regarding the supplier diversity departments of many of the nation’s leading corporations?  For example, Walmart recently announced that it would actively promote procurement from woman-owned businesses in their global supply chain.

    Many SD departments are working to make sure their supplier diversity policies and practices are being implemented globally.  The same holds true for the quality standards that they require of their diverse suppliers.  Environmental requirements are carefully woven into the fabric of best practices due to the potential for supply chain risk and ISO 9001 (and ISO 14001) are global quality standards.  Global supply chains need global quality standards.

    A great resource that illustrates global diversity initiatives in play is WEConnect, the international extension of WBENC.  WEConnect International is a corporate led non-profit that helps empower women business owners succeed in global markets.  Their membership list reads like a “Who’s Who” of the nation’s leading brands and even as an NGO, they are committed to quality standards.

    In 2011, BIZPHYX led WEConnect to ISO 9001 certification and in 2012 we led WBC Southwest (the Southwest council of WBENC) to ISO 9001 certification.  Both groups appreciated the need to become quality organizations that embrace internationally recognized, global quality standards like ISO 9001 (and ISO 14001).  They set the example for their member base (WBEs), many of which are becoming “global” diverse suppliers by working for and with Fortune 500 companies.

    Other resources that you can check out regarding global supplier diversity initiatives (including opportunities to bid on direct or subcontracting opportunities that are offshore) are the NMSDC’s Global Link and the International Trade Centre. We encourage you to listen to a recent podcast from Joan Kerr, Director of Supplier Diversity and Development with PG&E.  Joan is the Supplier Diversity Chair for ISM and she discusses many of these resources in her podcast.

    Another great tool for diverse suppliers wanting to do business with the Federal Government (which can have a global implications) is Gov Win. We recently tweeted their blog post and they re-tweeted our findings.  This post has great information on how to become compliant in federal procurement which includes CCR, FAR and OCRA.

    With regard to corporate sustainability, we still see ISO 14001 as a great way for corporations and diverse suppliers to address their environmental and sustainability goals.  In a few weeks we have a new article coming out that will demonstrate how some of the big brands are leveraging ISO 14001 in their supply chains.

    Diverse suppliers are really no different.  Once a corporate client integrates a diverse supplier into their global supply chain, they integrate both opportunities and risks.  Corporations need to make sure that their suppliers meet certain environmental goals and standards.  Their standards could be based on legal, regulatory and conformance requirements or measurable goals and objectives set forth by the client, such as eco-footprint or zero waste.

    There are a few who don’t share the passion for ISO 14001 or certifications in general, such as the premise put forth in this article from The Guardian, a UK publication.  However, in the absence of some type of supplier audit or the regular audits associated with maintaining an ISO certification, there is simply no way to substantiate that statements have translated into actions.  That’s why we’re seeing more small/diverse suppliers meet the environmental and sustainability requests of their corporate customers, by certifying to standards like ISO 14001.

    We don’t see this trend reversing since procurement professionals embrace global quality standards.  In the 2011 ISM Supplier Diversity Study it was revealed that procurement executives want to do business with diverse suppliers, but 70% report having difficulties finding “quality suppliers” in their category of spend.  See the problem–and one key solution?  Quality certification like ISO 9001 and ISO 14001 answer this challenge.  The ISM study is on the BIZPHYX Knowledge Base.

    Next week, tune in for a podcast profiling the diverse supplier–ARTÉMIA Communications based in San Francisco.  This marketing communications firm chose to certify to ISO 9001, ISO 14001 and TL 9000 (the telecommunications quality standard) at the same time.  They are leading a best practices trend.

    For more information related to ISO certifications contact info@bizphyx.com.

     
  • support 12:43 am on June 27, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , globalization, ,   

    Update From The Field: Sustainability, Risk Mitigation and Globalization-Where Is Your Business? 

    This past week we attended the 2011 WBENC (Women’s Business Enterprise National Council) National Conference and Business Fair held in Las Vegas.  While several different educational tracks from government procurement to supply chain management were featured, there was a consistent theme that resonated throughout the conference: sustainability, risk mitigation and globalization.  We have profiled these trends on the support desk, including a recent series on ISO 14001 and corporate sustainability.  As global supply management evolves, you must stay informed about current topics that impact corporate supply chains if you want to compete for contracts, earn business and deliver results.  Trends such as risk mitigation, sustainability, globalization, innovation and supplier development (which includes quality standards) are shaping the way corporations do business with suppliers.  There is an increased focus on sustainability initiatives in integrated and end-to-end supply chains.  Most multi-national corporations have adopted sustainability criteria into some or all aspects of their strategic sourcing processes.

    What does this mean to your organization?  What does quality management have to do with these trends?  Everything.  As a supplier, your ability to embrace these requirements in your business will determine if you can remain competitive in a global marketplace.  As an organization that utilizes your own suppliers, these trends affect your growth, expansion and ability to keep costs down.  Being certified to a quality management system, like ISO 9001 or TL 9000 is one way to address these critical supply chain requirements.

    Quality management, Six Sigma and a variety of other supplier requirements such as ISO 14001 were discussed as ways to tackle sustainability issues.  The WBENC Opportunity Connection Conference reinforced many of the topics we have been clarifying for clients over the last six months.  This summer we are publishing a new article on TL 9000’s alignment with ISO 14001.  For our readers certified to ISO 9001 and TL 9000, you will learn how incorporating ISO 14001 into your quality management program will help you address sustainability and globalization issues.  If you are not yet certified to a standard, this article may help you finally see the value in taking that leap!  Stay tuned this summer.  These trends are now becoming requirements and certifying to a quality standard provides the best framework to help you meet these demands.  For assistance, contact us: info@bizphyx.com.

     
  • support 2:43 am on February 21, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , BIZPHYX: The TL 9000 Experts, reduction of network outages, TL 9000 for Cable providers,   

    Benefits Of TL 9000 To Cable Providers: Competitive Advantage 

    As we wrap up the series on the benefits of TL 9000 in multiple communications segments, I was thinking about how to distinguish a message regarding the benefits of the TL 9000 to service providers in the cable space.  Quite frankly the message is much the same regardless of market segment: by using TL 9000 as a standard quality management system for suppliers you can control costs within your supply chain, reduce supply chain risk and improve key performance in areas such as, on time deliveries and reduction of network outages.  All of these advantages make sense outright, just as they do for traditional telecommunications wireline and wireless service providers.   However, there is a way that cable providers can look at TL 9000 as being particularly beneficial to their industry-competitive advantage.

    TL 9000 can clearly help cable providers by bringing a strategic competitive weapon to the marketplace.  Cable providers are vying for the same customers against service providers with a long tradition of quality and network uptime.  Until now, this industry segment has not followed a single quality standard for their operations.  (Workmanship standards are another category and I’m sure standards exist for how equipment is installed and maintained.)  I am not disparaging cable providers, as they may not be aware that such a communications quality system exists.

    It is often said; when in Rome do as the Romans do.  Cable providers need to be aware that the major providers have already adopted the TL 9000 quality management standard.  TL 9000 and standardized network operating policies have been a strategic competitive weapon for wireline and some wireless service providers for quite some time.  Standardized measurements required for TL 9000 certification allow certified companies to benchmark themselves against their competitors within their service category. This means that at any given time they will know if they are best in class, worst in class, average, etc. for on time delivery, customer complaints, network or service outages and defective services.

    Imagine as a cable operator, if you reported this type of blind data and had access to it too? You would pay hundreds of thousands of dollars for this type of data from companies that lack the specific expertise of QuEST Forum, TL 9000’s sponsor.  QuEST Forum is made up of member service providers and suppliers that all have industry expertise to lend to working committees that develop the standard and the measurements.

    Cable companies could also encourage critical suppliers within their own supply chain to adopt TL 9000 so they would have a standard way of ensuring that suppliers meet their requirements. The TL 9000 quality standard would be a very effective way for cable suppliers to improve customer satisfaction based on fact based data, shorten their time to market and compete effectively with other providers in the communication’s marketplace. For more information about the standard, contact the TL 9000 Experts and/or e-mail us at info@bizphyx.com.

     
  • support 4:18 am on February 9, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: BIZPHX: The TL 9000 Experts, , Independent Local Exchange Carriers,   

    TL 9000 Benefits For Independent Local Exchange Carriers (ILECs)? 

    This week we are discussing the benefits of TL 9000 for ILECs.   As an independent local exchange carrier executive you may have heard about TL 9000 or QuEST Forum, but may be unfamiliar with TL 9000 and wonder how it might benefit your company.  TL 9000 has been adopted as a common quality language across multiple suppliers and service providers in the telecommunications industry.  The beauty of TL 9000 is that it provides service providers like yourselves a way to ensure that your suppliers are using a systematic method for delivering their products and services to you.  It has been very successful in improving on time delivery and overall customer satisfaction since its introduction in 1998.

    One of the prime benefits of having one quality management system through the entire supply chain is that suppliers and service providers are that suppliers–can reduce cost of supply by eliminating rework resulting from poor installations, support services and products.  Furthermore, with TL 9000 there is an emphasis on risk management planning in order to help reduce risk of supply on your behalf.  Companies are required to identify risks to your projects in order to ensure that they consider them in advance, plan to eliminate or reduce them and recover should all else fail.  Risks such as labor shortages, single source suppliers and others are predicted in advance and dealt with.  These plans are required to be reviewed and updated regularly.

    Finally, there are formal means for receiving and responding to customer problem reports related to hardware, software and service products.  This process requires solutions to be provided by your suppliers within certain time frames according to the seriousness of the problem or require you to solve them according to customer contract arrangements depending on the type of business you are in.

    All of this means that you can standardize your system of tracking and reporting performance among your suppliers.  It reduces the amount of overhead you need to have to maintain multiple supplier report cards and can significantly reduce or eliminate supplier quality audits. I would encourage you to check into TL 9000 to see if it would work for your company as it has for many major service providers.  If you have any questions about TL 9000 implementation contact bclancy@bizphyx.com.

     
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